SeeStar®

Easily adjustable CT guiding device

The first simple sketch of SeeStar® was made on a napkin in 1999. SeeStar® now comes in three color coded sizes, developed to assist you in CT guiding.

  • Visualize and adjust the planned CT-guided biopsy before entering the needle
  • Reduce the number of needle manipulations1
  • Support the needle during superficial punctures
  • Maintain the direction of the needle during puncture

1) ”CT fluoroscopy guided punctures performed with a freehand technique and in combination with a new needle guiding device”. A. Magnusson et al.; Dept. of Radiology and Medical Physics, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden; presented at ESTI 2007, Athens, Greece.

Product assortment

SeeStar® 14G

SeeStar 14G

SeeStar® 14G

Green
ID 2.2 mm (0.087 inch)
Suitable for needle sizes 14 and 15G

Sterile, single use

Ordering information:
13-314 SeeStar® 14G
MOQ 5 units

SeeStar® 17G

SeeStar 17G

SeeStar® 17G

Pink
ID 1.6 mm (0.063 inch)
Suitable for needle sizes 17 and 18G

Sterile, single use

Ordering information:
13-317 SeeStar® 17G
MOQ 5 units

SeeStar® 20G

SeeStar 20G

SeeStar® 20G

Green
ID 1.0 mm (0.039 inch)
Suitable for needle sizes 20 and 21G

Sterile, single use

Ordering information:
13-320 SeeStar® 20G
MOQ 5 units

Documents

Click reference to view abstract

Osteoid osteoma is a slow-growing tumour with limited growth potential. In the past, treatment comprised open surgery with en-bloc resection or curettage of the tumour. In recent years, various minimally invasive percutaneous treatments have gained popularity. We report on six patients who underwent computed tomography-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablations of osteoid osteomas between January 2000 and December 2003 in a regional hospital in Hong Kong. Technical success was achieved in all procedures, with a mean follow-up of 40 months (range, 18-65 months). Five of the six patients achieved complete pain relief after the procedure and remained pain-free on subsequent follow-up. One patient with persistent symptoms after the first ablation was successfully treated with a second ablation. The mean in-hospital stay was 2.4 days. Progress in radiological healing was observed in all patients. There was one complication of skin burn over the needle entry site. Our experience shows that percutaneous computed tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive and cost-effective treatment for osteoid osteoma.

Elsevier’s new Problem Solving in Radiology series offers you a concise, practical, and instructional approach to your most common imaging questions. In the Musculoskeletal Volume, you’ll find expert guidance on how to accurately read what you see and how to perform common office procedures, including arthrography and biopsy. User-friendly features such as numerous tables, boxes, tips, rules of thumb, and an atlas-style appendix put today’s best practices at your fingertips. A full-color design, including more than 700 high-quality images highlight critical elements and compliment the text, to enhance your understanding. Best of all, a bonus CD provides you with musculoskeletal CT, MRI, and ultrasound protocols, patient questionnaires, and an appendix that details how to properly image the hip.

OBJECTIVE: To preliminarily evaluate a new CT-biopsy guidance device, the SeeStar® (Radi, Uppsala, Sweden), for use in musculoskeletal applications. DESIGN: The device was evaluated using an imaging phantom and in various simulated clinical biopsy situations. The phantom study was undertaken to optimize the linear metallic artifacts produced by the guidance device. The phantom and guidance device were imaged with CT after altering different imaging parameters, including field of view, filter, focal spot size, kV, mAs, slice thickness and pitch. Clinical biopsy situations were simulated for a superficial biopsy, a deep biopsy and a horizontal biopsy approach.
RESULTS: Altering CT parameters had little effect on the subjective appearance of the linear metal artifact, which is used to plan the biopsy approach. Placement of an 18-G needle inside of the biopsy device was subjectively helpful in exaggerating the artifact. Use of this artifact could be helpful in planning biopsy approach for deep lesions or lesions near critical structures. The metal guide on the device adequately supports a standard biopsy needle, making it potentially advantageous for biopsy of superficial lesions and lesions approached from a horizontal orientation.
CONCLUSION: Use of this CT-biopsy guidance device is potentially useful for musculoskeletal applications. The linear metal artifact produced by the device can help plan the biopsy approach. The device can also be useful in biopsy situations where the biopsy needle requires external support during imaging.

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